Testicle. HE (1). Human. Low magnification of a testicle, surrounded by a thick connective tissue capsule corresponding to the tunica albuginea (A). Outside is a small fragment of the epididymis (E). Inside the testicle, there are numerous sections of the seminiferous tubules (T). (Asterisk: rete testis).
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Testicle. HE (2). 2x Human. The testicle is covered by a thick connective tissue capsule called the tunica albuginea (A). Inside the testicle, the seminiferous tubules (dates) are compacted and follow a very tortuous path, so they appear sectioned in different planes of cut: transverse (tr), longitudinal (lg) and tangential (tg).
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Testicle. HE (3). Human. 4x. In the testicle, the seminiferous tubules are located inside the testicular lobules, which are separated by narrow connective tissue septa called septula testis (S). The seminiferous tubules are sectioned in different planes due to their tortuous trajectory. Among the seminiferous tubules, there are very loose connective tissue spaces (asterisk), where blood vessels (V) and lymphatic vessels can be found.
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Testicle. HE (4). Human. 4x. Region of the testicle corresponding to the rete testis (R). They are irregular spaces lined by a simple cuboidal epithelium (arrow). In these spaces is where the sperm formed in the seminiferous tubules accumulate before leaving the testicle. (T: seminiferous tubules).
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Testicle. HE (5). Human. 10x. The tunica albuginea (A) is a thick connective tissue capsule that delimits the testicle. Its external surface is lined with a simple squamous epithelium corresponding to the tunica vaginalis (arrow). In the albuginea, lymphatic vessels (asterisk) are observed. Immediately below the albuginea, seminiferous tubules (T) are sectioned in different cutting planes.
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Testicle. HE (6). Human. 20x. Detail of the tunica albuginea, in which showing medium-sized blood vessels (V) (an artery in the image), lymphatic vessels (L) and even Leydig cell cords (arrows). In the immediate vicinity of the albuginea, in the spaces among the seminiferous tubules (S), medium-sized vessels (A) (an artery in the image) are located, which form a plexus called tunica vasculosa. Lymphatic capillaries (asterisks) are also frequent in these spaces.
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Testicle. HE (7). Human. 10x. The seminiferous tubules (T) follow a very tortuous path inside the testicle, thus appearing sectioned in different cutting planes: transversal (t), longitudinal (l) and tangential (asterisk). Among the seminiferous tubules there are relatively wide spaces, occupied by very loose connective tissue, where small cell nests of Leydig cells are observed (arrow).
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Testicle. HE (8). Human. 20x. Cross section of different seminiferous tubules (T). These tubules are lined by a seminiferous epithelium, the appearance of which varies between tubules. Thus, in some cases, slightly differentiated spermatids (arrow) with rounded nuclei can be seen in the vicinity of the lumen. In other regions, however, there are more differentiated spermatids, in which the tail (arrowhead) that protrudes into the lumen of the tubule has already developed. (L: Leydig cells).
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Testicle. HE (9). Human. 40x. The seminiferous epithelium that lines the seminiferous tubules presents a stratified aspect. The precursor cells of the sperm are organized in three regions: the most peripheral cells correspond to the spermatogonia (a), above them, the cells with largest nuclei are spermatocytes I and II (b), and the cells closest to the lumen are spermatids (c) in different stages of differentiation. Poorly differentiated spermatids are identified (blue arrow), along with more differentiated spermatids whose tails (red arrow) protrude into the lumen. Surrounding the seminiferous tube are flattened myofibroblasts (arrowhead). (L: Leydig cells).
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Testicle. HE (10). Human. 40x. The appearance of the seminiferous epithelium varies greatly from one tubule region to another. In this section, the spermatids situated close to the lumen are very differentiated, with a well-developed tail (arrow). Along with these spermatids there is a thick, eosinophilic bodies (arrowhead) that corresponds to the residual bodies of the spermatids, which will be phagocytized by the Sertoli cells (red arrows). These cells located in the deep third basal of the seminiferous epithelium are characterized by a large oval nucleus, with a highly developed nucleolus.
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Testicle. HE (11). Human. 40x. Tangential section of a seminiferous tubule showing meiotic divisions of spermatocytes. Near the lumen there are small groups of differentiating spermatids, whose nuclei have already lengthened, although the tails have not yet sufficiently developed.
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Testicle. HE (12). Human. 40x. Longitudinal section of a seminiferous tubule showing small groups of differentiated spermatids (arrow) in areas closest to the lumen, with their tails protruding into the lumen of the tubule. Deeper, there are spermatocytes I (arrowheads) at different stages of maturation.
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Testicle. HE (13). Human. 40x. Group of Leydig cells (L) in their most characteristic location: the interstice among the seminiferous tubules (T). They are polygonal cells, with a rounded nucleus and a foamy cytoplasm due to the accumulation of small lipid droplets (arrow), whose content has dissolved with the use of organic solvents during the paraffin inclusion process. The presence of lipofuscin pigment (arrowhead) is detected in some of these cells. These cells synthesize testosterone.
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Testicle. HE (14). Human. 10x. Rete testis. A region of the testicle formed by irregular spaces (asterisk), lined by a simple cuboidal epithelium, separated by abundant connective tissue rich in collagen fibers. The rete testis is the place where all the sperm, formed in the seminiferous tubules, gather before leaving the testicle by the ductuli efferentes. (T: seminiferous tubules. L: lymphatic capillaries).
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Testicle. HE (15). Human. 40x. Transition zone between a seminiferous tubule and a straight tubule. As seen in the cross section (asterisk), the germ series cells disappear, while the Sertoli cells remain (arrows). The straight tubules (not present in the image) are lined by a simple cuboidal epithelium, and empty into the rete testis. (T: seminiferous tubule. L: Leydig cells).
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Testicle. HE (16). Human. 20x. Transition zone from a seminiferous tubule to a straight tubule, which finally empties into the rete testis. In this region, the cells of the germinal series disappear, remaining the Sertoli cells (arrows) as columnar cells of pale cytoplasm, above which cuboidal cells (arrowhead) that line the straight tubules are located,(yo cortaria esta frase dejandola así. These cuboidal cells are also found lining the rete testis) presenting the same characteristics as the cells that cover the rete testis.
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Testicle. HE (17). Human. 40x. Detail of the previous figure, showing the transition between the seminiferous tubules and the straight tubules. In these regions there are only Sertoli cells (S), covered by cuboidal cells, until the tubule is only lined by a simple cuboidal epithelium (arrow). Among these tubes there is a connective tissue space (asterisk) rich in collagen fibers.
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Testicle. HE (18). Human. 40x. Longitudinal section of a straight tubule (Tr), lined by a simple cuboidal epithelium, with the same characteristics as that of the rete testis. On the right there is a cross-section of the transition (asterisk) between a seminiferous tubule and a straight tubule. In this transition zone, only Sertoli cells (S) are found and, above them, cuboidal cells (arrow) that are in close contact with the light.
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (1). Human. 100x. Sertoli cells (S). In the seminiferous epithelium, the Sertoli cells play a fundamental role in the sperm maturation process. These cells rest on the basement membrane, and show a truncated pyramid shape, generally difficult to see. However, in this image you can guess its contours, as marked by the arrowheads. Frequently, the apex of the Sertoli cells, close to the lumen, is related to a small group of differentiating spermatids (arrow). (Asterisk: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (2). Human. 100x. With routine histological techniques such as HE, the Sertoli cell are identify by the characteristics of their nuclei. It is large, oval, euchromatic and with a highly developed nucleolus (arrowhead). The nucleus of these cells is generally located at the height of spermatocytes I (arrows) or among spermatogonia (E). (Asterisk: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (3). Human. 100x. Spermatogonias. They are the stem cells of the spermatogenic series. Along with Sertoli cells, they are the only cells that rest on the basement membrane (arrowhead) of the seminiferous tubule. They have a rounded or oval nucleus (N), with a prominent nucleolus (arrow) that can be located in the center or on the nuclear periphery, depending on the type of spermatogonia. (I: spermatocytes I. II: spermatocytes II. E: spermatids. M: myofibroblasts).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (4). Human. 100x. The spermatogonia (asterisk) are divided by mitosis, such as the one marked in the image with the arrow, which specifically corresponds to a metaphase (it is known that the division is from a spermatogonia because it is located in the deepest part of the seminiferous epithelium). In this way, spermatogonias generate cells that will differentiate into spermatocytes (E) and, at the same time, self-sustain the spermatogonia population. (L: Leydig cells).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (5). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in leptotene stage (L). In these cells the first meiotic division begins. The different stages can be identified by the characteristics of the nuclear chromatin. In the leptotene stage, chromatin adopts a finely granular structure (arrow), sometimes showing small dense granulations (arrowhead). (Eg: spermatogonia. S: Sertoli cell. Es: poorly differentiated spermatids. Asterisk: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (6). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in zygotene stage (C). In this stage, the chromosomes are more condensed and they group themselves at one end of the nucleus (arrow), leaving a large, very pale nuclear space (red asterisk), adopting the typical image of a bouquet. In this stage, the pairing between homologous chromosomes begins. (Eg: spermatogonia. P: spermatocyte I in pachytene. Es: spermatids. Blue asterisk: light of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (7). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in zygotene stage. Tangential cut of the seminiferous epithelium that affects a region where spermatocytes I are observed in zygotene (C), along with others in the leptotene stage (L).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (8). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in pachytene stage (P). In this stage the nuclei of the spermatocytes increase in size, the homologous chromosomes are completely paired and spread throughout the nucleus, so the chromatin acquires a thick cross-stranded appearance. Each of these strands (arrowheads) corresponds to a pair of homologous chromosomes (tetrad or bivalent). It is at this stage that crossovers between homologous chromosomes, also called crossing-over, occur. (Eg: spermatogonia. Es: spermatids. Asterisk: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (9). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in pachytene stage. This stage is the longest in the prophase of the first meiotic division. In the right part of the image, pachytenes can be observed in an intermediate stage (blue arrow), while in the left they are observed in a more advanced stage (red arrow), where the bivalent ones (red arrowhead) are thicker and they begin to leave a small clear space (asterisk) in the center of the nucleus. In the seminiferous epithelium closest to the lumen, little differentiated spermatids (E) with a rounded nucleus are identified, observing in some of them a small nuclear depression (blue arrowhead) that corresponds to the acrosomal vesicle. (Eg: spermatogonia. L: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (10). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in the diplotene stage. Tangential section of the seminiferous epithelium that has affected a group of spermatocytes I in the diplotene stage (D). In this stage, the bivalents are highly condensed, broad, and the so-called chiasms can be seen. They are formed because of the dismantling of the synaptonemic complex between the homologous chromosomes. This causes a slight separation of bivalent, revealing the chiasms (arrowheads), which are observed as small X-images. At the same time, the highly condensed chromosomes, move towards the periphery of the nucleus, leaving a small clear space (asterisk) in the center of the nucleus.
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (11). Human. 100x. Spermatocytes I in diakinesis stage (it can also be considered a very advanced diplotene). In this stage the nuclei reach their maximum size, the chromosomes are highly condensed (arrowheads) and located on the periphery, leaving a wide clear space (asterisk) in the center of the nucleus. (Es: spermatids. L: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (12). Human. 100x. Tangential section of the seminiferous epithelium showing a meiotic metaphase (arrow) of a spermatocyte, located among numerous spermatocytes I in the zygotene (C) and pachytene (P) stages.
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (13). Human. 100x. Poorly differentiated Young?? spermatids. Spermatids are always located in the vicinity of the lumen of the seminiferous tubule and can be observed at different stages of maturation. The image shows barely differentiated spermatids (E) showing broad, slightly elongated nuclei with homogeneous heterochromatin. Behind the nucleus, the microtubule “manchette” (arrowheads) is seen as two parallel lines, which appear to "prolong" the contours of the nucleus. (C: spermatocyte I in zygotene. P: spermatocyte I in pachytene. S: Sertoli cell. Asterisk: lumen of the seminiferous tubule).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (14). Human. 100x. Spermatids in an intermediate stage of differentiation. At this stage the nuclei of the spermatids (E) are narrow, elongated and heterochromatic. The microtubule “manchette” (arrowheads) is much longer and faces the lumen (asterisk) of the seminiferous tubule. The tail of the spermatid is not yet clearly identified. Near the spermatids, deeper in the seminiferous epithelium, spermatocytes II (II) which present a rounded nuclei of chromatin arranged in lumps, are observed. (Eg: spermatogonia. P: spermatocyte I in pachytene. D: spermatocyte I in dyplotene. S: Sertoli cell).
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Spermatogenesis. Testicle. HE (15). Human. 100x. Set of spermatids (E) in an advanced stage of differentiation, located close to the lumen (asterisk) of the seminiferous tubule. They have a narrow, elongated and heterochromatic nucleus (arrow), and stand out for their long tails (red arrowhead) that protrude into the lumen. Slightly deeper in the seminiferous epithelium, near the heads of the spermatids, rounded and dark formations are observed that correspond to residual bodies (blue arrowhead). They are remains of the cytoplasm of spermatids that are phagocytosed by Sertoli cells. (Eg: spermatogonias. P: spermatocytes I in pachytene. Es: poorly differentiated spermatids. S: nucleus of the Sertoli cell).
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Epididymis. Head. HE (1). Human. 2x. The head of the epididymis is located next to the testicle (T), near the tunica albuginea (A). The ductuli efferentes (Ce) located in this head, are organized in the so-called coni vasculosi (lobuli epididymis). The coni are separated from each other by well-defined connective tissue septa (asterisks). In addition, sections of the ductus epididymis (E), showing a wider lumen, are seen in the head of the epididymis.
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Epididymis. Head. HE (2). Human. 2x. At the head of the epididymis are located the ductuli efferentes (Ce), organized in the so-called coni vasculosi (double-pointed arrows), which are delimited by a well-defined connective tissue septa (asterisks). These ductuli collect sperm from the testicle (from the rete testis) and transport them to the ductus epididymis (E), with a wider lumen and also located at the head of the epididymis.
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Epididymis. Head. HE (3). Human. 10x. The ductuli efferentes are lined by a pseudostratified epithelium (E), characterized by the variable height of the cells, making an irregular inner contour of its lumen. The spaces (asterisks) among the different sections of the ductuli efferentes are occupied by a loose connective tissue that causes the head of the epididymis to form a compact structure. (C: connective tissue septum that delimits the coni vasculosi).
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Epididymis. Head. HE (4). Human. 20x. The epithelium lining the ductuli efferentes is pseudostratified, with groups of ciliated cells (arrow) alternating with groups of secretory cells (arrowhead). Each cell group has a different height, making the lumen contour of these ductuli efferentes irregular. Small groups of sperm (asterisks) can be found in the lumen of some of these ductuli efferentes.
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Epididymis. Head. HE (5). Human. 40x. Cross section section of a ductulus efferentes, lined by a pseudostratified epithelium. In this epithelium groups of ciliated cells (blue arrowhead) can be identified along with other taller secretory cells (red arrowhead). Some cells of the lining epithelium contain pigment (P), possibly lipofuscin. Surrounding the ductuli efferentes is a narrow layer of smooth muscle cells (arrow) arranged circularly.
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Epididymis. Head. HE (6). Human. 40x. The ductuli efferentes are characterized by an irregular contour of its lumen due to the lining pseudostratified epithelium, which is made up of groups of ciliated cells (blue arrowhead) that alternate with groups of taller secretory cells (red arrowhead). Surrounding the ductuli efferentes is a narrow layer of smooth muscle fibers (arrow) arranged circularly. The ductuli efferentes are the only portion of the excretory ducts of the testis that have ciliated cells.
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Epididymis. Body. HE (1). Human. 2x. The epididymis (E) is made up of a single duct (ductus epididymis) about six meters long, which has a very tortuous path. It is attached to the surface of the testicle, being separated from it only by the tunica albugínea (A). The lumen of the ductus epididymis (asterisks) is larger than those of the seminiferous tubules (S) present in the testis.
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Epididymis. Body. HE (2). Human. 4x. The tunica albuginea (A) separates the epididymis from the testis. In the epididymis, different sections planes of the ductus epididymis (E) are observed, showing a large lumen and is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium. Multiple sections of smaller diameter seminiferous tubules (S) can be seen in the testis.
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Epididymis. Body. HE (3). Human. 10x. Different sections of the ductus epididymis. Most of them are cross sections, but there is also a longitudinal (asterisk) and a tangential section (arrow). The ductus epididymis is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium (E) with stereocilia at the apical pole. In some sections of the lumen, large masses of sperm (arrowhead) are observed as the epididymis is the place where male gametes accumulate.
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Epididymis. Body. HE (4). Human. 20x. Cross section of the ductus epididymis. It is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium (E) with stereocilia (arrow) at the apical pole that protrude into the lumen, where some sperm cells are observed. Surrounding the tubules is a small layer of smooth muscle cells arranged in a circular pattern (arrowhead). The spaces among the sections of the ductus epididymis are occupied by a loose connective tissue (asterisk) moderately rich in fibers, which keeps the entire epididymal duct cohesive.
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Epididymis. Body. HE (5). Human. 40x. Detail of the epithelium of the ductus epididymis. It is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium with nuclei located at different heights, giving the false appearance of stratification. At the apical pole some fringe-like structures stand out, which are the stereocilia (arrow). Joining the cells at the apical pole, small basophilic structures can be seen, that correspond to the terminal bars (arrowhead). Surrounding the ductus epididymis is a thin layer of smooth muscle fibers (M) arranged circularly.
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Vas deferens. HE (1). Human. 2x. Low magnification image showing a cross-sectioned vas deferens. A small lumen lined by a mucosa (arrowhead) similar to that of the ductus epididymis is identified. In the wall, in an intermediate position, there is a very thick muscular layer (M), surrounded by the adventitia (A). The great development of the muscular layer of the vas deferens is due to it being the engine of ejaculation.
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Vas deferens. HE (2). Human. 4x. The vas deferens has a small lumen lined by a mucosa (M) that has a columnar epithelium with stereocilia, similar to the one that covers the ductus epididymis, but less tall. Outside there is a thick muscular layer (arrows), made up of smooth muscle fibers, organized into three layers: an inner (I) longitudinally orientated, a middle (Mm) (thicker) arranged circularly, and an outer (E), also thick, longitudinally oriented. Outside is the adventitia (A).
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Vas deferens. HE (3). Human. 10x. The lumen of the vas deferens is lined by a mucosa, formed by a simple columnar epithelium (E) with stereocilia (arrowhead), supported by a narrow lamina propria (asterisk). Next, the longitudinal inner muscular layer (I) is located, and more towards the outside, the circular middle layer (M) is observed.
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Vas deferens. HE (4). Human. 20x. Detail of the lining epithelium of the vas deferens, consisting of columnar cells with stereocilia (arrowhead). The epithelium rests on a narrow lamina propria (asterisk), and outside, the inner longitudinal muscular layer (I) is observed. Further outward is the circular middle layer (M).
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Spermatic cord. HE (1). Cross section of a spermatic cord (minipig). It is made up of the vas deferens (D), accompanied by the spermatic artery (E), which is surrounded by a large venous plexus, which as a whole corresponds to the pampiniform venous plexus (P). A connective tissue fascia (F) surrounds the cord, and next to it is the cremaster (C), a small bundle of skeletal muscle located near the fascia.
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Spermatic cord. HE (2). 4x. Cross section of a spermatic cord with a vas deferens, located inside. Its lumen is lined by a simple columnar epithelium (E) with stereocilia, and it has a thick muscular layer (M) made up of smooth myocytes. In the adventitia (A) the presence of blood vessels (V) and nerves (N) is observed.
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Spermatic cord. HE (3). 20x. Detail of the mucosa that lines the vas deferens, consisting of a simple columnar epithelium (E) with stereocilia (arrowhead) supported on a narrow lamina propria (asterisk). Outside is the muscle layer (M).
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Spermatic cord. HE (4). 4x. Detail of the spermatic artery (E) cross-sectioned and the accompanying pampiniform venous plexus (P). The spermatic artery has a thick muscular layer (asterisk). Next to the artery is a venous plexus made up of numerous venous vessels (V) with a wide lumen. In some of these veins, the presence of venous valves can be observed (arrow).
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Spermatic cord. HE (5). 4x. Set of veins belonging to the pampiniform plexus (P) located in the spermatic cord. Many of these veins have a somewhat thicker wall (arrows) compared to that of veins present in other regions of the body. (C: cremaster muscle).
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Spermatic cord. HE (6). 4x. Cross-sectioned cremaster muscle (C). A small skeletal muscle bundle that accompanies the spermatic cord and is located next to the fascia (F) of the cord. (P: pampiniform plexus).
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Prostate. HE (1). Human. 2x. The prostate is a tubuloalveolar gland, whose tubuloalveoli (A), have rounded or elongated shapes of varied sizes. As a general rule, the tubuloalveoli, regardless of size, have a wide lumen of irregular contour. Among the tubuloalveoli there is a stroma (asterisk) very rich in collagen fibers and smooth muscle cells.
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Prostate. HE (2). Human. 4x. The prostatic tubuloalveoli (T) constitute the secretory units of the prostate. They are elongated or rounded structures that have large lumens of variable size and with an irregular contour. Among the tubuloalveoli there are connective tissue spaces (asterisk) where there are abundant collagen fibers and smooth myocytes.
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Prostate. HE (3). Human. 10x. The prostatic tubuloalveoli are characterized by having an irregular contour, showing small papillae (arrows) that protrude into the lumen. The epithelium that covers them is columnar, formed by secretory cells with a pale apical cytoplasm (arrowhead). The connective tissue spaces (asterisk) among the tubuloalveoli have abundant collagen fibers intermingled with smooth muscle cells.
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Prostate. HE (4). Human. 20x. The secretory units of the prostate correspond to the tubuloalveoli (asterisk). They are characterized by having a wide lumen, with an irregular contour because they have small papillae (arrows) that protrude towards the lumen. The tubuloalveoli are lined by secretory columnar cells, with a pale apical pole (arrowhead). Among the tubuloalveoli there are wide fibromuscular septa.
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Prostate. HE (5). Human. 20x. The cells that line the prostatic tubuloalveoli are columnar secretory cells, with the nuclei displaced towards the basal pole and a pale-appearing apical pole (arrow), where the secretory granules accumulate. The wall of the alveoli has small irregularities that protrude toward the lumen and correspond to small papillae. In the lumen of the tubuloalveoli, oval or rounded (arrowhead) formations of variable size, so-called acervuli, are frequently seen and often calcify. A connective tissue rich in collagen fibers and smooth muscle cells occupy the spaces (asterisk) among the tubuloalveoli.
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Prostate. HE (6). Human. 40x. The prostatic tubuloalveoli are lined by secretory columnar cells (arrows), with the nucleus displaced towards the basal pole. The apical cytoplasm that appears pale, being the place where the secretory granules accumulate. Beneath the secretory cells are cells with a round or oval nucleus that correspond to basal cells (arrowhead). Sometimes they are so abundant that they almost form a layer immediately below the secretory cells. Surrounding the tubuloalveoli are smooth muscle cells and abundant collagen fibers (asterisk).
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Prostate. HE (7). Human. 20x. The acervuli (arrow) are very frequent in the lumen of the prostatic tubuloalveoli. They are spherical, acellular masses often calcified and organized in concentric layers.
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Seminal vesicle. HE (1). Human. 4x. The seminal vesicle is made up of a tubular structure that twists and compacts into a single gland. This gland is characterized by its irregular mucosa (M), with many folds (asterisk) protruding into the lumen. Outside is a muscular layer (m) formed by smooth muscle cells.
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Seminal vesicle. HE (2). Human. 10x. The mucosa (M) of the seminal vesicle is very irregular, showing numerous evaginations and invaginations, even creating mucosal bridges (arrow). It is lined by a simple secretory columnar epithelium (arrowhead), which rests on a narrow lamina propria (asterisk) that forms the axis of mucosal irregularities.
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Seminal vesicle. HE (3). Human. 20x. Mucosa of the seminal vesicle showing numerous irregularities. It is lined by a secreting simple columnar epithelium (arrow), which contains a yellowish pigment. The axis of the mucosa folds is formed by the lamina propria (asterisk), made up of loose connective tissue.
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Seminal vesicle. HE (4). Human. 40x. The secretory epithelium that forms the mucosa of the seminal vesicles is columnar simple. The cells of this epithelium frequently have a yellowish pigment (arrows) located in the apical pole, possibly due to the abundance of flavins in the secretion product synthesized by these glands. The epithelium rests on a narrow lamina propria (asterisk), where some capillaries (arrowhead) containing red blood cells can be seen.
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Seminal vesicle. HE (5). Human. 100x. High-magnification detail of the secretory lining epithelium of the seminal vesicles. It is a simple columnar epithelium with rounded nuclei located at the basal pole. The abundant amount of yellowish pigment located in the apical pole is striking. Possibly this pigmentation is due to the abundance of flavins present in the secretion product of the seminal vesicles. The epithelium rests on the lamina propria (asterisk) formed by loose connective tissue, where blood capillaries (arrow) containing red blood cells can be seen.
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